Archive for the ‘Internet’ Category

Walking the Walk

May 3, 2019

Many people  are upset about Facebook’s recent changes.  In addition to banning individuals it considers to be dangerous (and what exactly are the criteria for being labeled dangerous, and who gets to decide them and determine who meets the criteria?), Facebook will ban other users from linking to external sites (such as Infowars) it deems inappropriate.  Repeated attempts by a Facebook user to link to banned sites could or will result in that Facebook user being banned from Facebook as well.

You might think that this is all a good idea or not.  You may like Infowars or you might not.  At the end of the day this is a good reminder that Facebook is not a government entity or some other sort of entity that is required to do things the way we think it should.  It is a business with owners and a Board of Directors and investors.  They are convinced that implementing these sorts of policies will not hurt Facebook’s business.  If they thought it would, they probably wouldn’t do it.  For all the talk about community and connectivity, at the end of the day money talks.

So here’s what to do if you’re upset.  It’s what you should probably do if you’re not upset either, because while you may agree with banning these particular people and sites, one day you may find that other people and sites are banned that you don’t see as problematic.  Pendulums have this nasty habit of swinging back and forth.  Or  even if the pendulum doesn’t swing back, what kind of community and connectivity do you have if you only ever see and hear things that you agree with or that reflect one particular ideological direction?  Are you comfortable cutting everyone out of your life who doesn’t agree with your political or social or religious views?  Many people may be, but should you?

So, here’s what you do.

Go through all those Facebook friends.  Those who are actually friends and you actually keep in touch with, message them and request direct contact information.  E-mails or phone numbers or addresses.   Instagram or  other platform usernames (though these will be less useful  as inevitably, if Facebook succeeds, other platforms will follow suit).  Figure out how to stay in touch one on one without an inbetween entity.

And when you have all that data, then get rid of Facebook.  If you want to send a message, send it this way, but deleting your account.  If enough users were to do this, I’m sure Facebook would notice and perhaps even rethink its policies.  Facebook is a company focused on making money.  As such it is free to do what it wants or thinks is best in this regards within the limits of the law.  But consumers are free to respond to those changes and indicate if they approve of them or not.

Back in the 80’s Coca Cola decided it would change the recipe for Coca Cola to make it sweeter, more like Pepsi.  I and millions of other Coca Cola lovers objected, loudly.  We refused to buy the new product, and raised a pretty big stink about it.  Coca Cola eventually re-introduced the original recipe as Coca Cola Classic.  Companies can make mistakes just like people can.  Sometimes those mistakes can be moved past, other times they can’t.  The question is ultimately what are you going to do about it, personally?  Are you willing to quit using Facebook?  Sure, it will be inconvenient to some extent.  Are you willing to suffer a little for something you believe is right?

More importantly, are you willing to take a risk to find out if it really is inconvenient or painful to live without it?

 

 

 

Domain Name Change

April 29, 2019

For the second, and hopefully last time in 13 years, the domain name/web address for this blog will be updated.  Technically, it’s reverting to the original name that I had to forego when I migrated to WordPress a few years ago.  Actually, nearly five years ago, which is hard to believe.

So if you’ve been used to reaching this site through livingapologetics.wordpress.com, please make note of the domain name that may be replacing it (or may be working alongside it) living-apologetics.org.

The changes should take place sometime in the next few days if all goes well.  Thanks for your patience and perseverance!

 

 

Not An Influencer

April 27, 2019

I’ve begun unfriending people on Facebook.

It’s not that I desire to be unfriendly, but I’ve decided that in the coming weeks I’m going to gradually whittle away the people I’m friends with in anticipation of finally eliminating my account completely.

I can’t say it is an easy process.

I joined in 2008, and to give up on something after a decade isn’t easy in and of itself.  And of course everything about social media is oriented towards gaining friends and followers, not eliminating them.  And for years I thought that an expanding number of friends on Facebook (even a meager number by many standards!) was a sign of my role of influence and importance to these people.  But I’m no social media influencer by a long shot.  (In case you’re not aware, influencer is the term some people use of themselves and others because of a particularly large number of social media contacts and corresponding leverage for advertising or activism).  Social media functions by playing on our needs and desires for approval and status, things I’ve fought against all my life but sometimes not very successfully.

Going through my list of friends I’ve begun be eliminating those whose accounts are inactive – a sign that they’ve already gone down the road I’m starting on and are farther along than I am.  It’s also a demonstration that the connections created by social media are hardly very strong – I  didn’t even realize that half a dozen or so of my friends have deactivated their accounts.

The second group I’ve begun eliminating are connections from high school.  I’ll save the friends I was closest to till the end, but the reality is that the connection we had once has severely decayed over time.  I haven’t seen most of them in close to ten years.  One or two I’ve seen more recently, but our connection – if it’s going to remain – won’t be because of Facebook.

I’m amazed and depressed by how difficult clicking Unfriend can be.  Our desire for approval and acceptance and admiration (or is it just my desire) is strong, and admitting that those things – if they’re there at all – are so weak and insignificant as to be of truly no meaning is not easy or pleasant.  It’s getting easier though, and now that I’ve begun the process I don’t think it will be as complicated as I thought to complete it.

It just makes me wonder where I’ll look for affirmation and approval next.  Hopefully more in Christ, and less in myself and others.  I don’t say that as a word of judgment against those of you who continue on Facebook or other social media.  But  rather as a word of judgment on myself.  And maybe only a word of caution to others.

 

The Times They Are A-Changin’

April 24, 2019

And not for the better, in case you were wondering.

A too-brief article about a too-large subject – the impact of technology on human beings and human society and culture.  Much is at stake when technology is less about helping you do what you need to and more about trying to ensure you stay connected as long and regularly as possible.

Movin’ On Up

April 22, 2019

Perhaps not exactly to a deluxe apartment in the  sky, but an improvement all the same.

I’ve bit  the bullet (paid) to upgrade my blog site from free to a paid plan through WordPress.  The annoying advertisements are now gone.  I intended to do this much sooner but, well, life and money and what have you.  Look for some tweaks and changes to roll out as I explore the options I have available now as a paid user of the site – including possibly a change back to my original domain name (livingapologetics.org) instead of the WordPress name.

All in good time, but at least it’s the first step.  Perhaps a step up?

Skynet Jams

April 19, 2019

In all the worries about robots and artificial intelligence (AI), one element we might have neglected to worry about – what will our robot overlords listen to as they attempt to eradicate humanity?  I mean, if humans use our musical jams to get us through workouts and other rigorous things, why not AI?

So here is a death-metal streaming YouTube channel.  The music is created non-stop by an online neural network.  Seems kinda appropriate for a bunch of robot warriors, doesn’t it?

 

What’s on Your Pastor?

April 4, 2019

A famous tagline for a credit card is What’s in your wallet?  A simple question posed by smiling, wealthy, successful entertainment spokespersons that imply perhaps your credit card should be the same as theirs.  After all, if it’s good enough for the rich and famous it should be good enough for you, and perhaps it will bring you a bit closer to that status yourself?

But should parishioners be paying attention to what their pastor is wearing?  Some folks think that it’s worth consideration, and I can’t really fault them for raising the question.  Of course part of my agreement is couched in the comfort of knowing that nobody is going to call me out for $1000 shoes.  One of my parishioners expressed surprise a few years ago when I wore a different shirt to teach Bible study class.  My wardrobe is sparse, perhaps too much so.

There are some who would say that’s a sin, something I criticized briefly years ago.  Or at least a marketing disaster.  Pastors are in the public eye, and need to take better heed of their personal appearance.  And at some level this is true.  I remember one seminary prof who strongly reminded us to keep our shoes polished.  He once had a parishioner chide him for his scuffed and worn looking shoes.  That anecdote sticks more firmly in my mind than much of my Hebrew lessons, but I still don’t shine my shoes very often.  Are leather shoes, even the sensible, not-too-expensive-but-still-polishable kind an offense, an indulgence or luxury because others don’t have them?

Perhaps.

Though of course these things are relative as well.  I don’t consider my Levis a luxury, but somebody else likely could.  I splurged on my sunglasses a couple of years ago, and undoubtedly that could be questioned.  When it comes to most everything that we do and wear someone could always point out that there is some level of extravagance by some corresponding vantage point of poverty.  At what point do you draw the line?

One of the pastors mentioned in this article asserts that all the pricey items they were sporting were gifts to them.  Does that make the situation any more or less awkward?  If you mention to the rich and famous, if they pay you a salary that many pastors might only dream about, and shower you with perks that aren’t any big deal to them – much as a rural parishioner might drop by a few pounds of pork spare ribs to put in the pastor’s freezer – is it sinful to accept?  It’s a slippery slope, and one I don’t feel comfortable calling others out for.  But pastors should remember that it *is* a slope.  And even if it’s a simple thing and a blessing to them and the giver, people are always watching, and somebody, somewhere is going to be offended.  Even if they don’t choose to put it out on Instagram.

He Says it Better

January 24, 2019

lewis

Things Geeks Fight About

December 6, 2017

I tend to believe what this guy says, in contrast to whatever amazing stories you might have read on the Internet.  The difficulty with being clever is that you aren’t always sure when the time is right for cleverness.

Me Too?

October 16, 2017

Facebook’s latest protest meme is for women to post Me Too in a status update if they have been the victim of sexual harassment of some kind in the past.  The idea is solidarity with the women who were abused by Harvey Weinstein.   The intent of the Facebook thingy is to show that the headlines are only the tip of the iceberg, that it wasn’t just a few up-and-coming or hopeful starlets who have been bullied, harassed, abused, or worse.  Women of all walks of life have had moments of harassment that unite them in a common outrage.

I don’t have a problem with something that draws attention to a dangerous and sinful problem that human beings of all cultures and backgrounds have to deal with.  I have no doubt that there are many women who have been mistreated by men, manipulated mentally, emotionally, or physically simply for the gratification of another person.  This is a terrible and awful reality.

The problem I have with it is that in the effort to create unity, there is precious little talk about what actually defines harassment or manipulation.  We’re being indoctrinated to believe that it is possible to speak and act in ways that are completely inoffensive to all people at all times, yet the net result of this indoctrination seems only to be showing how completely and utterly untrue and impossible this is.  Someone is always offended, even if the person accused wasn’t trying to be offensive or was completely ignorant about the peculiar cauldron of experiences and issues that would lead someone to be offended in that moment.

Is asking a woman out an example of a man harassing or intimidating a woman, if she feels harassed or intimidated?  Obviously there are some behaviors and statements that most of us could and would agree upon as patently offensive or blatant examples of intimidation.  But the grey area seems inordinately large.  We can attempt to understand one another better in an effort to communicate more clearly and effectively and mitigate or reduce the number of unintended offenses.  We can be more diligent about protecting those who speak out against those who abuse their power to coerce or intimidate or harass others.  But there are limits to all of these things, and we’re also aiming at a moving target.  This doesn’t mean we shouldn’t aim, but it should make us cautious about the self-righteousness of our attempts.

Particularly it should make us cautious of applying definitions and standards we have created today to characterize situations and behaviors and individuals in the past.  Trying people in our past by standards only acceptable and recognized today is potentially unfair, recasting the past in a light that it may not have naturally experienced.  Jokes and innuendos about casting couches have been around pretty much as long as films have been.  Calling out Weinstein and others for their abuses in the past isn’t unfair because there was an understanding in the past that those behaviors were inappropriate.

Is the supervisor at a workplace 30 years ago to be thought of as a sexual predator for asking out a young woman?  Maybe.  Was he intentionally using his position as a means of pressuring her to accept?  Was there the explicit idea that refusal would jeopardize her job?  Foul play.   But not every supervisor who asks out someone in a lower power position is a sexual predator, and we ought to be careful about recognizing this.  Making someone uncomfortable accidentally shouldn’t implicate that person as predatory or bullying.

Hopefully we can all learn together how to be better co-creations of God the Father, seeing one another as someone that God the Son has died and risen from the dead for, and that God the Holy Spirit is actively trying to work within.  We can help one another towards that end by articulating what is and isn’t appropriate.  So go ahead and post Me Too if that’s appropriate.  I pray that there can be some healing and forgiveness in that honesty.  But I also encourage people to try and ensure their feelings and reactions to something aren’t coloring the event, turning it into something it might not have been.