Reading Ramblings – January 17, 2021

Date: Second Sunday after the Epiphany – January 17, 2021

Texts: 1 Samuel 3:1-20; Psalm 139:1-10; 1 Corinthians 6:12-20; John 1:43-51

Context: The liturgical season of Epiphany started Janury 6 – 12 days after Christmas. Last Sunday was the festival of the Baptism of Our Lord, so this is the second Sunday after the Epiphany. Epiphany is a Greek word meaning appearance or manifestation. As Christmas celebrates the humanity of our Lord, the season of Epiphany calls us to contemplate his divinity, that in Jesus of Nazareth the very Son of God came to dwell with and among us. However the season of Epiphany ended last Sunday, and this Sunday marks the first Sunday of Ordinary Time in the liturgical year – Sundays not part of a particular season. As with Ordinary Time later in the year after Pentecost, the Sundays are noted in relation to the last major festival. That means right now the Sundays are noted in respect to Epiphany, just as later in the year they will be noted in respect to Pentecost. As such, while psalm, Old Testament and Gospel readings all work together in some respect, the Epistle readings revert back to more or less consecutive readings from particular books in the New Testament, in this case 1 Corinthians.

1 Samuel 3:1-20 – Some mistake the silence of God as evidence He is not here, or at least not paying attention. Yet this reading makes it clear first of all that silence is not unusual with God, and secondly that He is indeed paying attention. Eli perhaps thought God would not care that his sons were extorting God’s people (1 Samuel 2:12ff). Evil often seems to run unchecked, leading some to conclude God does not exist or does not care. Scripture repeatedly reminds us that all of creation will be accountable before God, and that sometimes such accountability will come here and now as well as in eternity. God’s people are therefore to cling to what is right, to resist evil both in themselves and others, and when evil seems to prevail, trust that God who is sovereign over all things will indeed set things right in his own time. The existence of evil in the world around us is a constant reminder of the evil that lurks within our own selves, and a call to daily give thanks to God through whom temporal forgiveness and eternal reconciliation are made possible because of the incarnate obedience of the Son of God, Jesus the Christ.

Psalm 139:1-10 – Verse 6 functions as the balancing moment for the first half of the psalm. God is indeed sovereign and omnipresent, sustaining all of creation moment by moment in his power, and this includes you and I. How will we react to this knowledge? Some react against it, angry and frustrated, seeking to establish what independence and separation they can from God by rejecting him completely. But the psalmist realizes this ever-presence of God is actually a beautiful thing, a blessing too marvelous to understand. This should help us interpret the next six verses not as the author (and therefore we as the speakers) lamenting there is no place to run or hide from God, but rather as thanksgiving that there is literally nowhere in all of creation where we are without God’s sustaining presence. Our lives may take us in diverse directions and we may lose all connection to the familiar and the beloved in this world, but nothing can remove us from the constant presence of God. He who created us (vs.13ff) abides with us in Spirit every bit as much as He did in the incarnate Christ.

1 Corinthians 6:12-20 – Paul writes to a group of Christians with some rather major misunderstandings of their lives of faith. They are Christians – Paul has asserted this from the beginning of his letter to them and in no way wavers from this point. He knows they are in Christ, but that doesn’t mean they know how a life in Christ looks and works. They – like us – need to be taught and reminded, lest worldly ways of thinking creep in and ultimately displace or distort the truth of forgiveness through the blood of the resurrected Son of God, Jesus the Christ! In this section Paul is likely paraphrasing or quoting popular phrases – either in Corinth in general or particularly in the Christian congregation there. They emphasized their freedom in Christ to their detriment, engaging in or permitting behavior amongst themselves that was dangerous and scandalous. Our freedom in Christ is not freedom to be our own masters, determining right and wrong as we see fit. Rather our freedom in Christ means we have been bought with the blood of Christ. We are not free – but we are free from the slavery of sin. We are not free to be our own masters, but we are free finally to submit ourselves to slavery in Christ, knowing him to be the master we were created for and in whom we have all good things. Even those areas of our lives we guard most zealously in terms of control, whether our sexual behaviors (Chapter 5, 6:15-18) or our business dealings (6:1-11), all are subject to the authority of Christ.

John 1:43-51 – Jesus begins calling his disciples in the Jordan River valley just outside of Jerusalem very shortly after his baptism. Arrangements and agreements are made here which are later activated once Jesus and the others have returned to Galilee and made the necessary arrangements with their families. John the Baptist encourages his own followers to become followers of Jesus by pointing out Jesus as the promised Messiah (1:29-37).

I tend to see a lot of humor going on in this passage. Nathanael’s incredulity that Nazareth might have something valuable or good to contribute to the world at large. Jesus’ assessment of Nathanael as an honest man – perhaps too honest for his own good? Nathanael’s immediate declaration of faith that Jesus is in fact the divine Son of God and promised Messiah simply because Jesus knew where Nathanael was previous to their encounter. And Jesus’ reminder that we too often expect too little of our God, who is always willing and able to provide vastly more than we could conceive of asking for.

Jesus begins his ministry with the affirmations of God the Father (1:32) as well as John the Baptist (1:29-31) as to his identity. His disciples are convinced despite their previous interest in John the Baptist. His disciples exhibit a healthy uncertainty and reluctance to jump to conclusions. But they are also clearly convinced in short order of Jesus’ identity and purpose, even if that identity and purpose will continue to also be confusing and elusive to them (John 6:16-20). So we are called to follow in faith, not because we have all the answers but because we are convinced that Jesus alone has the words of eternal life (6:68)

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