Book Review – Liturgy Made Simple

Liturgy Made Simple by Mark Searle

 

I recently inherited a small trove of Catholic theological books.  I was able to winnow the boxes down to about a dozen or  so books I thought might be helpful or interesting to look through, and this was the first.

If you’ve never really given much thought to why you do the things you do in worship, this is a great introductory resource to stimulate thought.  It presents the liturgy from the Roman Catholic perspective, which is not too terribly different from my own Protestant denomination’s understanding of it.  There are a few differences that someone with an alternative theological background to Roman Catholicism will pick up on.  And of course, if you aren’t already somewhat familiar with or sympathetic to the centuries-old pattern of worship and liturgical elements, this may be  confusing to you.  But it should provide a good means of thinking through certain things.

I particularly like his emphasis on the importance of authenticity.  This is a word that is getting more traction these days, particularly among younger generations.  Searle questions the propriety of changes made in the  liturgy or Sacraments in the name of convenience.  The one which particularly stood out to me was his criticism of mass-produced Holy Communion wafers.  Those terribly thin and terribly tasteless things that are, technically, a form of bread, but which bear more resemblance in all sensory forms to styrofoam than bread.

Yes, it takes time and effort to bake bread for Communion.   But I argue (having re-instituted actual baked, unleavened bread for our congregation’s Eucharist) that  it is an investment of time and energy more than worth the effort.  For the central celebration of the Christian community, how can we accept mass-produced products as somehow appropriately representative of the Body of Christ?

This is a short (under 100 pages) and easy read with questions for reflection and discussion afterwards.  It was likely used as a classroom resource for a seminary or pre-seminary program and would be ideal in that setting.  Some terms are taken for granted and not defined, but with a minimal amount of Googling, even the most contemporary-oriented, hipster pastor or worship team should be able to make use of this resource.

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