Reading Ramblings – April 23, 2017

Reading Ramblings

Date: Second Sunday of Easter ~ April 23, 2017

Texts: Acts 5:29-42; Psalm 148; 1 Peter 1:3-9; John 20:19-31

Context: Easter is not a single day but a season, eight weeks that take us to the day of Pentecost and the last major season of the Church year. The readings during the season of Easter emphasize the power stemming from Christ’s resurrection, as well as on elaborating the Easter story itself. Although the assigned Gospel for Year A in the three-year lectionary cycle is Matthew, John’s Gospel is the key one for the high holidays of the Church year, and we’ll revert to Matthew after Pentecost for the remainder of the liturgical year. Also during Easter the Old Testament readings are replaced by readings from Acts that emphasize the resurrection power unleashed in the Holy Spirit.

Acts 5:29-42 – Jesus’ crucifixion was to be the end of his preaching. No doubt the religious authorities expected his followers to disperse rapidly after his execution. But because of his resurrection, his disciples who up until that point were timid and clueless are now emboldened and articulate. Where once they feared the power of the religious authorities they now considered themselves bound to an even higher authority. Confronted with this unexpected turn of events, the Jewish leadership convenes to form a plan. It is Gamaliel who speaks to his colleagues and advises temperance. That which is not from God will flounder on its own – and history is littered with pretenders to the title of Messiah and their disappointed followers. But the true power and authority of God cannot be thwarted, and for 2000 years this has proven true as followers of Jesus Christ, based on eye-witness testimony of the resurrection, continue to share good news with those around them.

Psalm 148 – God’s creation is exhorted to praise him. The heavens and the heavenly host is first exhorted, then the objects of the sky. Next come the mighty creatures of the oceans and the very seasons themselves. Next the earth itself is summoned to praise, creatures of the earth, then the human powers of earth and finally the classes of people considered lowest – women, children and old people. God is to be praised by all of his creation for raising up a horn of salvation, a reliable and trustworthy deliverance in his promised Messiah, Jesus.

1 Peter 1:3-9 – What a beautiful description of the reality of the life of faith! Peter begins with blessing and praising God the Father as the author of the plan of salvation brought to fruition through God the Son, Jesus the Christ. Because of God the Father’s mercy, He has extended life to those who hold faith in the resurrection of Jesus from the dead. That life is characterized as a glorious inheritance, far surpassing our best conceptions of inheritances here and now that can be frittered away or destroyed. God’s faithful rejoice in his mercy and his promises despite the reality that life can be very challenging and that God’s faithful have often and regularly been singled out for persecution and destruction on account of their faith. But even in our sufferings, God’s faithful are called to rejoice, trusting that the worst of the world and our defeated enemy Satan can only inevitably be to the glory and praise of God the Father when Jesus returns in glory.

We, the faithful who have not seen Jesus resurrected in the flesh nonetheless can love him and trust him based on the faithful account of his disciples. In doing so, we give thanks to God for what He accomplishes in the faith He himself places within us – our eternal salvation.

John 20:19-31 – John continues the description of Jesus’ Easter appearances. Since Luke tells the story of the two disciples on the road to Emmaus, John instead focuses on Easter evening and Jesus’ appearance to his worried disciples in the locked upper room. The reports are strange and hard to make sense of. Jesus has been seen alive by multiple people, men and women, in Jerusalem and beyond. Finally, the ten disciples see him for themselves, and He offers them compelling proof that He is truly alive again. They are not seeing a ghost, they are not hallucinating. They are able to touch his body, explore his wounds, and verify that it truly is him and not somebody else.

His visit is not simply cordial. He conveys to them the peace of the Holy Spirit and the essence of the Church – the declaration of forgiveness. The Church is to be the one who speaks what Jesus has accomplished, assuring individuals in repentance that their sins are truly forgiven through the death and resurrection of Jesus. While Jesus himself could forgive sins during his ministry (Matthew 9), He is free to delegate that message to his disciples and his Church.

Thomas is not present and is understandably skeptical. Despite the multiple reports of the women and the disciples, he is adamant that he will not believe unless he can see and touch for himself. His insistence on this should be comforting to those who worry that the disciples were weak-minded or easily swayed or fooled. Thomas would fit in well with our post-modern doubt of all things!

But when confronted with the resurrected Christ, Thomas is immediate in his declaration of faith and worship. He is convinced by his personal encounter with the resurrected Christ. John assures that while Thomas was blessed to receive such assurance, the eye-witness testimony of Jesus’ ministry, death, and resurrection should be more than adequate to convince someone of the truth of the matter. The resurrection is incredible, but not beyond belief. John invites us into the same confession of faith as Thomas, to not remain doubting or dubious but to explore the evidence and to believe.

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